Idea Of The “american Dream” In A Raisin In The Sun By Lorraine Hansberry

Even facing such trauma, they come together to reject Mr. Lindner’s racist overtures. They are still strong individuals, but they are now individuals who function as part of a family. When they begin to put the family and the family’s wishes before their own, they merge their individual dreams with the family’s overarching dream. He has a son, Travis, who he can only entertain and gain respect from by telling him stories of “how rich white people live” .

Although Lena is ahead of her times in some respects, her dreams and aspirations are largely linked to her family’s well-being, rather than to her own. Scholar Claudia Tate attributes Lena’s low expectations for her individual self to gender conditioning – a term used to describe the expectation that a woman’s goals and dreams be linked to her family alone. Lena tolerates her husband’s womanizing and remains loyal to him even though they suffer under the same impoverished conditions throughout their marriage.

The Black Ambition Of A Raisin In The Sun

A Raisin in the Sun displays a great recurring theme in life that many times the good of the few has to be sacrificed through the needs and propagation of the group. The character of Mr. Lindner makes the theme of racial discrimination prominent in the plot as an issue that the Youngers cannot avoid. The governing body of the Youngers’ new neighborhood, the Clybourne Park Improvement Association, sends Mr. Lindner to persuade them not to move into the all-white Clybourne Park neighborhood. Mr. Lindner and the people he represents can only see the color of the Younger family’s skin, and his offer to bribe the Youngers to keep them from moving threatens to tear apart the Younger family and the values for which it stands. Ultimately, the Youngers respond to this discrimination with defiance and strength.

a raisin in the sun theme essay

Walter Lee’s feelings about his dreams and Ruth’s attitude toward them crystallize in this passage. He is desperate to escape the circumstances of his life, and his dreams represent his belief that he can still change his life, in spite of his weak financial position. But the fact that Ruth does not support him drags him down; part of Walter Lee’s vision of his life is that he should have a wife who believes in him. Throughout the course of the twentieth century, the concept of the American dream changed dramatically, as displayed in Lorraine Hansberry’s play, A Raisin in the Sun.

A Raisin In The Sun Literary Analysis Essay Topics

At first his frustration is because of the family’s financial situation, but it… The play presents the story of a few weeks from the life of the Youngers family, an African American family living in the poor neighborhood of Chicago’s Southern area during the 50s. The play starts with the Youngers discussing how to spend the money they are going to receive from an insurance company after the death of their patriarch. The total amount of the policy is $10,000 to be received through a check. As the money is expected to arrive, all the family members are presenting their individual ideas on how to spend the money carefully not to let it go wasted. Mama, Lena, the mother of the Youngers, knows the importance of a house, the reason that she insists that they must purchase a house in some good neighborhood.

  • By basing A Raisin in the Sun around an insurance check and repeating the ways money can change the characters’ lives from poverty, Lorraine Hansberry argues that money is the prevailing power in society.
  • She goes to college and works at the agency instead of just working for her parents at their restaurant, she wanted more for herself in life.
  • She ends up doing all kinds of jobs to enable the family to move to a better house.
  • Mother Lena Younger and her grown up children Walter Lee and Beneatha share a cramped apartment in a poor district of Chicago, in which she and Walter Lee’s wife Ruth and son Travis barely fit together inside.

In the texts, A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry, The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, and Winter’s Bone by Daniel Woodrell, each protagonist fails to see the love their families want to give them. Instead of confiding in people who care, they attempt to overcome…… Whereas Joseph, a Yoruba student teaches Beneatha the rich culture and heritage of her ancestors in Africa and embraces her identity as a black woman. He later proposes to marry him and go back to Nigeria and continue her medical practice.

Ultimately, he chooses the honorable path so that he can stand before his son Travis with pride. It has often been said that you cannot teach an old dog new tricks. “Oh- So now it’s life. Money is life. Once upon a time freedom used to be life-now, it’s money. I guess the world does change.” Mama does not understand the generational importance of money because it was not a major factor during her era. Because money is such an important element in this play, the difference of opinions about it adds unnecessary conflict. A story of a family that is influenced by the malevolent power of money, A Raisin in the Sun teaches readers about how a family can https://writemyessaytoday.us/write-my-research-paper/ be torn apart by riches. When each family member dreams of his or her plans for the money, the family transforms from write my case study one solid unit into a pack of people fighting against each other in the hopes that their dreams will come true.

More Related Essays

Having a dream is what makes a person to never give up and hold onto what motivates us to achieve our goals. Most essays on A Raisin in the Sun focus on racial prejudice and economic hardships of migrating families. Also, we use great sources of information plus our structure is always on point. Beneatha and Walter Lee, on the other hand, are more selfish in their concerns. Travis, in typical childlike fashion, manipulates all the adults in the play in order to achieve his own ends.